Honoring Leah Coleman

Today, a family who has a deaf child contacted me through Facebook to ask my opinion on cochlear implants and American Sign Language. This is a weekly, if not daily, occurrence and I LOVE it when parents reach out to me.

I first refer them to my blog post “Cochlear Implants: My Two Cents

and THEN, I point them to this video, where I share how SO  MUCH can change because of “One Deaf Child.” But, before you click… I invite you to read on.

TODAY, December 8, 2015 is Leah Jane Coleman’s 19th Birthday.

Leah lives in Rochester, NY where she is attending her first year of college. She received two scholarships and was awarded her high school’s Sterling Scholar Award in Theater.

Yes, I am proud to be her mother, but not just for the reasons you might assume. While you’ve likely watched Leah grow up in your very own living room, and she’s very likely shared American Sign Language with you and yours… my proudest moment happened as she and I drove to her college campus for the very first time.

We arrived in Rochester after a red-eye flight from Salt Lake City, Utah where we had just wrapped the filming Signing Time Sentences hours earlier.

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We are tired. We rent a car and start toward a day of sorting out dorms, roommates, classes and the like.

We turn right and for the first time we face campus, (ahem) now “home.” Leah looking at the red, brick buildings ahead of us says,

“Mom. You know how some people believe in fate?   …I make my own fate.”

I love you Leah Coleman. I cannot wait to see what you choose to do with this incredible, beautiful, brilliant life that you live. You SHINE.

You have already made a profound difference in the lives of countless families. You’ve helped countless “Alex’s” communicate with their “Leah’s.” You’ve helped eliminate so much fear that the “Rachel’s” and “Aaron’s” have had as they enter this new world of deafness.

  • Make A Difference (You can check that one off your list…)

or you can keep doing that. It’s entirely up to you.

You make your own fate.

Love, Mom aka The Signing Time Lady

LOVE

 

6 thoughts on “Honoring Leah Coleman

  1. I love this post by my daughter Rachel Coleman, and I love the way she and Leah’s dad, Aaron Coleman, have parented Leah from day one. I remember telling them, during those “dark days” of not knowing where to turn, that “the only thing Leah can’t do is hear….” Later on we all realized that Leah is perfect the way she is and perfect the way she isn’t. That goes for everyone, you know. Leah’s parents gave her a the gift of Signing and the gift of Hearing (when she is wearing her cochlear implant.) Leah reminds me that when the implant is off, she is Deaf. She is prepared to learn, achieve, and be a support to others, in any of life’s arenas. Go Leah! Happy Birthday to the sweetest Leah in the world. You have led the way and accomplished so much good already in 19 years….and knowing you, Leah, you’re not planning on stopping! Create your Fate! I like how that sounds. Lots of LOVE always and forever, Grandma Linda

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  2. ThIs is special. I’d seen that video in the past, but I’m always interested in an update on you all. All three of my kids have iced learning to sign by watching signing time (and they have all been early, excellent talkers, despite the warnings I got about not speaking because we signed).
    As an aside, I hadn’t heard of Laura, only Leah and Lucy.

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    Rachel Coleman Reply:

    Well, let me introduce you to Laura.They Are Gonna Love You

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  3. Nine years ago today I found out I was pregnant with my second child. We were huge Signing Time fans and signed constantly with our then 2-year-old son. When discussing baby names, there was only one girl’s name we ever considered. Our Leah was born in August 2007. Happy Birthday to your Leah!

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  4. I am so glad that you and Aaron decided to share your wonderful family with us. You have all made a difference for so many people, and I’m excited for Leah as she continues on her own journey.
    I find it very easy to believe that she will continue making a difference in her own ways.

    Happy birthday Leah! Thank you for sharing so much of your childhood with us, and thank you for coming back to us again through Sentences and Christmas. Keep doing amazing things!

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  5. Oh my goodness, I felt like I was reading the story of my daughter. She was eight when she decided to get an implant. We too were told to stop signing. Rebekah could already speak and write in English. She is and will always be deaf. She is now a high school ASL teacher. We would not change who she is. Her implant is a tool much like glasses are a tool. Thank you for sharing the story of Leah.

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